borrow from our children

Tweet-o-sphere #DNC2016 #REVOLUTION

facebook1

my vacation from Facebook may be permanent

By Lara Trace (beleaguered journalist)

I totally agree that people should not vote for evil, greater or lesser.

Chris Hedges wrote:

PHILADELPHIA—The parade of useful idiots, the bankrupt liberal class that long ago sold its soul to corporate power, is now led by Sen. Bernie Sanders. His final capitulation, symbolized by his pathetic motion to suspend the roll call, giving Hillary Clinton the Democratic nomination by acclamation, is an abject betrayal of millions of his supporters and his call for a political revolution.

No doubt the Democrats will continue to let Sanders be a member of the Democratic Caucus. No doubt the Democrats will continue to agree not to run a serious candidate against him in Vermont. No doubt Sanders will be given an ample platform and media opportunities to shill for Clinton and the corporate machine. No doubt he will remain a member of the political establishment.

Sanders squandered his most important historical moment. He had a chance, one chance, to take the energy, anger and momentum, walk out the doors of the Wells Fargo Center and into the streets to help build a third-party movement. keep reading

I’m watching as little TV as possible but the one thing I don’t/won’t/can’t miss is Democracy Now. This entire week and last week, the debates and discussions aired by Amy and Juan woke me up BIG…

When the revolution came around again. The day Bernie Sanders’s candidacy ended is a familiar death date for radical movements—if you go by the French Revolution’s republican calendar. (read Atlantic Daily)

 

HMMM, this is not an election but a selection... Lara

(my apologies- the interview with Leonard Peltier will publish next week.)

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banner_takeaction-942x2501.jpg

Billions trafficking and enslaving “disposable people”

By Lara Trace (abolitionist)

“It’s all about the money. Human trafficking is insanely profitable. If you really think about it: You can sell a kilo of Heroin once; You can sell a 13-year-old girl 20 times a night, 365 days a year.”

Read this about a rescue at a truck stop

An estimated $150 billion is made by human traffickers, after the number one crime: drug trafficking…just think about the heroin epidemic happening in your neighborhood and illegal drugs being sold on your street. Trafficking drugs and people are street crimes, highly profitable. And it spreads like a plague:  Alaskan Arctic Development concerns

John Trudell calls this trafficking process “mining humans.” The atrocity we are seeing with drugs and human trafficking is a sign we are living in an unhealthy damaged society.

Watch these:

I posted several articles on this topic when this blog focused on human trafficking and modern day slavery, starting back in 2012.

jan_trafficking_month

Young men and women must be taught at an early age that women and children are not for sale.  These traffickers find new victims every single day and find buyers for them.

In the money game, every human sold becomes a profit machine, so the only way to end this slavery is to stop playing this game and buying sex.  Our children need to know that they could be snatched off the street and trafficked, and even killed.

There are an estimated 20.9 million victims of human slavery, with 1.5 million in North America.

MORE Here

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Since 1999, Dr. Transchel has been researching modern day human trafficking around the world. Her findings, after interviews with dozens of victims, will surprise and shock even those who consider themselves well-informed. Besides for working as a professor of History at CSU Chico, Dr. Transchel provides trainings for various branches of the military as well as the state department, on domestic and international human trafficking and she also serves as an expert witness on human trafficking from Moldova in Federal Asylum hearings.

 

Sign HERE: Tell U.S. law enforcement to crack down on $150 billion human trafficking epidemic… you are not powerless… thank you!

 

One of my favorite poets shared this with me last night: https://jdubqca.com/2016/07/23/its-all-about-the-money/

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i lost

I have more questions than answers

By Lara Trace Hentz  (simply frazzled)

You can guess by the headline I am perplexed (again and again and again)… the violence we are seeing is a cancer now… is this a growing distrust of the American government? Is it new or old?  Read Race and Gun Violence 1968 & 2016

We need to recognize that the situation in Ferguson speaks to broader challenges that we still face as a nation. The fact is, in too many parts of this country, a deep distrust exists between law enforcement and communities of color.  Some of this is the result of the legacy of racial discrimination in this country. –Barack Obama LINK

Are there non-Americans who monitor America for its own human rights abuses/genocide/voting issues?

How about the UN:  Elections are a vital part of democratic transitions, decolonization, and the implementation of peace agreements around the globe, and the United Nations plays a major role in providing international assistance to these important processes of change.

This question is also BIG: Do the League of Women Voters have any say in the electronic voting machine debacle?  These machines are not exactly honest. Some believe voting in elections has been hijacked…

How to get recruited as Election Observer – Election observation

From Democracy Now:

Harvey Wasserman of Columbus, Ohio, has been a vocal critic of electronic voting machines.  He co-wrote the book, “What Happened in Ohio: A Documentary Record of Theft and Fraud in the 2004 Election.”  His upcoming book is titled “The Strip & Flip Selection of 2016: Five Jim Crows & Electronic Election Theft.”  We talk to him about his concerns for the upcoming presidential race.  SEE THIS

I wonder… Have we, as a colonizing nation, become so disheartened at what WE are seeing… are we asking “why now” and do we wonder if this government is a democracy or something dangerously corrupted? An Oligarchy – or just an Illusion?

Comment on RT story:   Obama not only failed to close GITMO as he promised but has done absolutely nothing to stop the institutionalised racism and violence of the USA police force.  Mr John Pilger’s book, “FREEDOM NEXT TIME” reveals the human rights violations of the USA government and its aggressive warmongering foreign policy which is the cause of all the worlds ills.

I recommend:

Presidential Campaigns Are Like Wildfires Michael Friedman, a composer who has worked on shows including Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, is traveling the country talking to voters about what’s on their minds this election season, and then turning his interview transcripts into original songs. In California recently, he spoke with a jaded network-news producer about Donald Trump’s hijacking of politics for entertainment. Here are her words, set to music. (The New Yorker Radio Hour)

Harlem Radio Station Tackles Violence by and Against Police Let Your Voice Be Heard! Radio, a program that airs every Sunday on WHCR in Harlem, has a devoted listener base of primarily black and Latino millennials, many of whom are outraged and saddened by the recent high-profile killings of men and women by police officers. The show’s hosts, Stanley Fritz and Selena Hill, discuss what their listeners are feeling, and what kind of action the show’s getting its audience to organize around. (The Takeaway)

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Who did THIS (top photo)?  This post is already big enough. You get the idea…

I do have more questions than answers…   xox L/T

 

The slippery-ness of democracy by Mary Beard

 

A well-documented feature of trauma, one familiar to many, is our inability to articulate what happens to us. We not only lose our words, but something…

Source: It Didn’t Start With You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are — WebInvestigator.KK.org

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scars

I’m reading good sh*t: the dweller, what is gaslighting, #60sScoop

good sh*t : parenting, French parenting, attachment theory, Jon Ronson on Ariel Leve, One Story blog, gaslighting, Joyce Carol Oates, scars, memoirs…

 

By Lara Trace (who is thinking about parents and parenting)

This is my excuse for a post this week.  I’m on the road most of the month… read ’em and leave me a nice comment on what great stuff you are reading or dwelling on… merci beaucoup… xoxox

Why the French parents are the best and we (Americans) suck at it: http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/06/french-parenting-government.html

The French have lots of good going on over there…

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Ariel Leve: ‘I was the parent and my mother was the child’

The journalist grew up on New York’s Upper East Side with her mother, a celebrated poet who partied with Andy Warhol and Saul Bellow. Now she’s lifting the lid on a deeply unhappy childhood (WOW WOW WOW to that )

It drives people nuts. But when you’ve been on the receiving end of gaslighting, a compulsion for accuracy can be a survival mechanism. Before you read my book, had you heard the term ‘gaslighting’?” I had: gaslighting means, “To manipulate someone by psychological means into questioning their own sanity.”

Ronson writes:

Leve says that even while writing the book, she wasn’t sure she’d actually publish it. I’m glad she did, because it is riveting and evokes with clarity the emotional turmoil of being subjected to the constant needs of a narcissistic parent. I’m sure it will help other people in similar circumstances. But then there is her mother, who is still alive….

“I’m not panicking you, am I?” I ask. “When you leave the restaurant, are you going to dwell on this part of the interview?”

“I’m a dweller,” she says.  (She had therapy to rewire her brain. It is called EMDR… wow!)

“Oh dear,” I say. READ NOW

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Attachment Theory and Motherhood? 

The poet Philip Larkin was not the first or the last to notice that parents, “they fuck you up.”

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Gaslighting is something to think about (top photo “Scars”): Violence Hurts

20 Diversion Tactics Highly Manipulative Narcissists, Sociopaths and Psychopaths Use to Silence You HERE

Even more on gaslighting: How can I make my parents’ stop abusing me? How can I just make the abuse stop?

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An investigative journalist gets pigeonholed in memoir, and memoir is not the whole truth.

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On Reconciliation with an Alcoholic Parent

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Family Comes First or does it?

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“How does someone accidentally find their biological mother online?” READ THIS CONFESSION

(I was thinking Stockholm Syndrome when I read about her guilt trip…)

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Yup, it’s that Joyce Carol Oates… who does great tweets!

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Sisters torn apart by 60s Scoop Reunited HERE

My memoir excerpt is here

Stolen Generations now on Amazon

Stolen Generations now on Amazon

 

 

NEW BLOG:::: Want to be an eye witness: email me: larahentz@yahoo.com  (writers\photogs are invited from across the planet blogosphere to post photos… you can be a contributor or send me a link to your post)

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black lives matter

A Hard Look at How We SEE Race #policeshootings

BLOG BONUS: In light of yesterday and the day before and the day before and last year and for many years, and the shootings of black men/women/children by police, it’s time we recognize how racial bias exists around us… Lara Trace

 

Tao did a great job here:  When we know better, we do better…  TALK TO YOUR KIDS

“For the first time in history, we’ll be able to see firsthand how police officers make contact with the public and how those interactions unfold in real time,” Eberhardt says. “And we’ll soon be in a position to design interventions that can directly affect the course of those interactions.”

A Hard Look at How We See Race

Jennifer Eberhardt’s research shows subconscious connections in people’s minds between black faces and crime, and how those links may pervert justice; law enforcement officers across the country are taking note. By Sam Scott, from Stanford Magazine
Winter 2015

 

Eberhardt’s research has shown that police—black and white officers alike—are more likely to mistakenly identify black faces as criminal than white faces. Illustration by Jacob Sanders

The first time Jennifer Eberhardt presented her research at a law enforcement conference, she braced for a cold shoulder. How much would streetwise cops care what a social psychology professor had to say about the hidden reaches of racial bias?

Instead, she heard gasps, the loudest after she described an experiment that showed how quickly people link black faces with crime or danger at a subconscious level. In the experiment, students looking at a screen were exposed to a subliminal flurry of black or white faces. The subjects were then asked to identify blurry images as they came into focus frame by frame.

The makeup of the facial prompts had little effect on how quickly people recognized mundane items like staplers or books. But with images of weapons, the difference was stark—subjects who had unknowingly seen black faces needed far fewer frames to identify a gun or a knife than those who had been shown white faces. For a profession dealing in split-second decisions, the implications were powerful.

Lorie Fridell, then head of research for a law enforcement policy group in Washington, D.C., says Eberhardt’s research helped her resolve a nagging paradox. She sensed that law enforcement had a problem with racial profiling. Yet she was certain the vast majority of officers would sincerely recoil at the idea of policing with prejudice.

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In 2004, with her reputation yet to be widely established, she organized an unprecedented conference at Stanford on racial bias in policing, bringing together scores of academics from across the country with law enforcement officials from 34 agencies in 13 states.

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More than a decade later, Eberhardt is no longer the anonymous academic she was then. A “genius award” from the MacArthur Foundation last year served as perhaps the broadest notice yet that Eberhardt is someone with something vital to say. Yet her signature remains the same: unsettling research revealing the long, pernicious reach of unconscious racial bias, and an unrelenting commitment to share her findings with the outside world.“This is not someone who is just doing work in the ivory tower of a university,” says Chris Magnus, chief of police in Richmond, California, a Bay Area city where a quarter of the population is black. “This is someone who is really out in the trenches working with police departments and the criminal justice system.”Eberhardt’s message is not an easy one to hear, particularly for the many Americans who think racial discrimination is largely a thing of the past, or that they themselves would never treat someone differently because of race, or that racism is somewhere else.In one study capturing how high the stakes are, Eberhardt and her colleagues analyzed two decades’ worth of capital murder cases in Philadelphia involving white victims and black defendants—44 cases in all. The defendants’ photographs were independently rated according to how stereotypically black they appeared.

 

During a lecture at Stanford in April, while standing under an image of Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old who was shot and killed by police in her hometown of Cleveland, Eberhardt made explicit the connection between her research and the events roiling the nation. The recent protests and tumult in response to police killings, she said, are part of the cost of not seeing—the price of our blindness to bias.

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rayon (1)

Music is Medicine | My Crazy Love for Rayon

beaded hummingbirds (1) rayon (2)By Lara Trace (former singer, keyboardist)

I don’t want you to think I’m dwelling on bad stuff all the time.  ME?  Heck NO!  I am a positively goofy “yellow bird” (a nickname) around out here in western MA… (But I do have bad days like everyone of you, of course.)

This got me to thinking about what REALLY makes me REALLY happily nostalgic.

Fabric? Music?  Music, definitely. Fabric is a close second. (Nostalgia isn’t what it used to be.)

Years ago I had a conversation in Seattle with a musician who told me, “music is medicine.” He even had a small record label by that name.  Oprah spoke of Maxi Priest and his music is medicine HERE.

Music was my focus and life in my teens and 20s.  I was a professional rock musician. It was more than a career. It was a calling… (and the weird thing is I am not finding any people in my first family who had musical talent but my adoptive parents were both talented musicians.)

music is the artIn May I wrote this about cleaning my closet: what happens when I touch old band clothes.

I made my own microphone. The picnic table was the stage.

Age 5, I made my own microphone. The picnic table was the stage.

WHO I WAS: The Dress

I don’t know about you but when I clean my closet, I do feel much better (brain wise). I put away coats, sweaters, knits and switch them out for crisp linen and cool cotton summer stuff.

I’d kept quite a few “vintage” dresses from my rock band days, which was in my 20s, eons ago.  They are like a scrapbook of fabrics (yet I don’t sew a lick!)

Why do I keep them?   …these are many many good reasons…

First, I am from a family of dressy women. My adoptive mom Edie wore evening gowns! I can’t even imagine a holiday dinner when she and I (and guests) weren’t dressing up.  When I left home at age 17 I had little money to buy like her but I did collect a mix of vintage rayon, satin, silk and retro velvet.

Second, when you are in a rock band, you barely make rent money. Wearing unusual band clothes was a “fitting” thing to do… especially if you are female.  Fitting is my way of telling you it was very hard for me to afford tailoring.  The rock bands I joined had no budget, seamstresses, or dress codes. When I started in the late 70s, there were a tiny handful of female singers.  (Hint: Linda Ronstadt was one. Heart came along eventually.))

Third, most of these dresses were found in thrift stores yet they are probably the most precious creations I could own or wear.  One vintage 1940s black rayon midi-length has two beaded hummingbirds (see PHOTOS).  I also wore this to work in Seattle, I wore it to nightclubs, I wore it on a cruise. It is still lovely but I did a crappy job hemming it years ago…I found a tiny hole in the bottom of the dress. (No tag inside means it must have been handmade.)

Fourth, mainly it’s the feel of fabric and touching recreates memory for me. (Sometimes I think being adopted did cause me some brain damage and trapped some memory in fog.) (I’ve kept some old tshirts from my travels too; some are from bands, of course.)

I think of band clothes as body armor; in a way these simple clothes create an illusion that isn’t there.  Black leather pants — and what do you think?

Some of my rock band clothes were gifted.  One blue velvet dress was given to me in college by a classmate (the mother of Wendy who I knew somewhat in high school). Her mom wanted me to have this family heirloom and of course I did wear it often.  (I do wonder if Wendy knew about this?)

There is even a pink quilted bed jacket my mom gave me.  No, I have not worn it.  When did the bed jacket thing get popular? I think women in the 1930s and 40s had much better “taste” than we do now.  (I’ll admit I’ve a taste for kitschy colorful table linens, too.)

The rayon green print wrap dress was found in an abandoned house in Wisconsin (my friend’s grandmother lived there and was deceased)(top photo of dresses) (I scooped up a black fur coat, too.) That green number was what I was wearing when I met Blackfoot. (You will have to read my memoir One Small Sacrifice to know that rock and roll saga). I also wore it when I sang in Automatic and then Tropic Zone in Minneapolis.

I didn’t give up on music; my first marriage killed it for me.

Maybe these dresses hold the music in me, the music of the 70s and early 80s.

Christmas 1972

Christmas 1972

And I still have the burgundy velvet mini dress with gold brocade from 9th grade that caused a major rift between my adoptive parents (mostly on how much it cost.) (Photo: Christmas 1972, there’s that velvet dress again.)

At age 23, I lived in New York City and coveted designer samples like angora sweaters. I even modelled shoes for Claudio Rocco, a high end designer from Italy. I modelled as much as I could, since it was huge money for a starving singer.  I am still racking my brain for where I bought a raw silk off-white  full skirt (see photo below) and matching buttonless Nehru jacket that I wore for decades! “Raw silk” even sounds good when you say it. (I think the clothing brand was Espresso.)

The raw silk skirt I loved when I was modelling

The raw silk skirt I loved when I was modelling

I don’t sing professionally anymore. I don’t even like to be in public that often.  (FYI: I was a chameleon of hair color.)  Today I’m salt and pepper grey. I don’t look for vintage dresses anymore.  Where would I wear them?

But these very old dresses do remind me of who I was.

My dresses also represent beauty to me.

And I am still “her” in many ways.

 

p.s. This blog usually focuses on the serious.  I wanted you to know I have a wacky silly side, too. xox

Read Requiem for THE YELLOW SUIT

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Manus x Machina at MMOA

❤ READ: The Evolution of Dressmaking HERE

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Music is medicine.  (Enjoy some of my music memories) It’s like taking a summer road trip with me! What’s your favorite?

 

 

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Saul Williams

THIS is who we are

http://www.democracynow.org/embed/show/2016/7/4

SPEECH: https://publish.dvlabs.com/democracynow/360/dn2016-0704.mp4?start=3201.0

 

Today I celebrate these voices. Join me. Lara

Red_Cloud2

Motives at Lake Mohonk | Mahpíya Lúta Red Cloud

“The early leaders of the Indian Rights Association (IRA) had a twofold purpose: to protect the interests and general welfare for the Indians, and to initiate, support, or oppose government legislation and policies designed to ‘civilize’ the American Indian.  By the term ‘civilize,’ the IRA in 1882 meant measures designed to educate, Christianize, make economically independent, and absorb the Indians as individuals into American society.” (Indian Rights Association Papers: A Guide to the Microfilm Edition 1864-1973, 1975, page 1.)

 

By Lara Trace (still doing historical research) (my Lakota name is Winyan Ohmanisa Waste La ke)

Motives. I do wonder about that.  If I give you something, what will you give me or expect in return.

The Indian Rights Association had a motive.  A big one.  Indians had no right to exist as they had for thousands of years.  Indians were in the way, an impediment to progress and westward expansion.  Back then Indians were supposed to just blend in and disappear.  How convenient.

President Thomas Jefferson, The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, December 29, 1813
“This unfortunate race, whom we had been taking so much pains to save and to civilize, have by their unexpected desertion and ferocious barbarities justified extermination and now await our decision on their fate.”

In 1851, the United States paid out more than $1 million in bounties for Indian scalps. (You’d be dead Indians then.)

Dark History…

But the violence didn’t stop with the assassination of tribal chiefs.

“In southern what is now Ohio, (Mohicans) set up an ideal Mohican community near the Pennsylvania border. These people had their own frame houses, picket fences, cattle herds, school houses in their language,” he said. “A hundred miles away, the frontiersmen in a Pennsylvania village decided the Mohicans were hostile.

“Now, these (Mohicans) were fundamentalist Christians, they were Moravian pacifists. The frontiersmen came in upon them suddenly and seized 96 of them and put them in a big barn. And while the Indians sang Christian hymns in their language and prayed for the souls of their captors, they were taken one by one to a blacksmith’s anvil and the Americans smashed their heads in with a maul. All 96 of them,” Wrone said.

For many years I wondered how “they” (presidents and others) came to decide what to do with the Indians, other than collecting scalps of dead Indians or smashing their heads, or massacres, of which there were many.  By the way, the IRA were not friends of the Indians, not even close.

Lake Mohonk, upstate NY where they met

The Lake Mohonk Conference is often where they came up with their plans:

The Lake Mohonk Conference 1883-1916

Wealthy people often feel that they know what is best for poor people.  From 1883 through 1916, a small group of wealthy philanthropists, who referred to themselves as Friends of the Indian, met annually to discuss American Indian policies.  As wealthy men, they had access to Congress, to the President, and to high ranking members of the government.  This meant that their recommendations carried more weight than that of the Indian leaders.**

The idea of having an annual meeting to discuss Indian affairs and then make recommendations to the government was initially the idea of Albert K. Smiley, a member of the Board of Indian Commissioners and a part owner of the Lake Mohonk Lodge (in upstate New York).  The annual meeting took the name of its meeting place and was called the Lake Mohonk Conference.

In general, the conferences envisioned the transformation of Indians from savages to citizens by three means: (1) breaking up the reservations, (2) making Indians citizens and subject to the laws of the states, and (3) education of the young to make them self-reliant.

The men who gathered each year tended to be well educated, financially secure (most were considered wealthy) and had been born into the upper classes of eastern U.S. society.  They often viewed their participation in the conference as a part of their larger Christian obligation to bestow the blessings of Christianity upon all of the under-developed people of the world.  While these reformers were genuinely concerned about justice for Native Americans, they were unremittingly ethnocentric.  To them, the Indian cultures-the tribal languages, values, religion, social models, communal ownership of the land, the aboriginal lifestyle-was an anathema to modern civilization.

The eastern philanthropists who met at Lake Mohonk had rather mystical faith in the value of private ownership.  They felt that private ownership of property had the power to transform the Indians into people more like themselves.  Believing in the sanctity of the private ownership of land, they had little understanding of Indian culture and little concern for the actual living conditions of Indians.

In their 1884 meeting, the Lake Mohonk Conference recommended that Indian education must teach the English language; that it must provide practical industrial training; and that it must be a Christian education.

The following year, Lyman Abbot, a well-known Congregational clergyman, called for the end to the reservation system.  He told the Lake Mohonk Conference:

“It is sometimes said that the Indians occupied this country and that we took it away from them; that the country belonged to them.  This is not true. The Indians did not occupy this land.  A people do not occupy a country simply because they roam over it.”

Like most Americans at this time, he was apparently unaware that Indians had been farmers and had developed their land long before the arrival of the Europeans.

Speaking at the Lake Mohonk Conference in 1886, Philip C. Garret, a member of the executive committee of the Indian Rights Association, called for the destruction of the distinctions between Indians and non-Indians.  This destruction is stopped by treaties and he asked that the treaties be set aside:

“If an act of emancipation will buy them life, manhood, civilization, and Christianity, at the sacrifice of a few chieftain’s feathers, a few worthless bits of parchment, the cohesion of the tribal relation, and the traditions of their races; then, in the name of all that is really worth having, let us shed the few tears necessary to embalm these relics of the past, and have done with them; and, with fraternal cordiality, let us welcome to the bosom of the nation this brother whom we have wronged long enough.”

In 1890, a group of Indian policemen had gone to arrest the Sioux Sitting Bull because of rumors that he had intended to attend the Ghost Dance at the Pine Ridge Reservation.  After a short skirmish, Sitting Bull was killed by Little Eagle (on December 15, 1890).  At the next Lake Mohonk Conference it was reported that all of the policemen were Christian and Sitting Bull was pagan.  According to the Conference:

It was the supreme struggle of Paganism against Christianity, and Paganism went down.  That is the second reason why there is this wonderful progress in this religious movement.

The 1896 Lake Mohonk Conference called for the abolition of the tribal system and for Indians to become citizens.  At this time, many Indians were not citizens and the only way that they could become citizens was to accept an allotment of land and to be eventually deemed “competent” by the Indian agent.

Occasionally, the Friends of the Indians did more than just talk about Indian issues.  In 1902, the Mohonk Lodge was opened in Oklahoma to stimulate the art of the women in the surrounding tribes – primarily Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache.  The store, first proposed by Christian missionaries at the Lake Mohonk Conference, provided the women with hides, beads, paints, and other materials at cost.  When the items were completed, they were sold back to the store to provide the women with cash.  In addition to new art items, some family heirlooms, such as cradles, were also sold to the Mohonk Lodge.

At their 1903 conference at Lake Mohonk in New York, they discussed: (1) the abolition of the Indian Bureau and all Indian agencies; (2) the extinction of all Indian tribal governments; and (3) the division of communal tribal land holdings among individual Indians.

While the philanthropists who met at Lake Mohonk strongly believed in the breaking up of the reservations through the allotment of the tribal lands to individual Indians, most Indians actively opposed allotment.  In 1906, for example, the White River Ute expressed their displeasure with allotment by attempting to leave the reservation.  The army made a strong show of force and “persuaded” them to return to the reservation under military escort.  Speaking about the Ute situation at the Lake Mohonk Conference, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs recommended not feeding them:

“It was not the government’s fault that they took the course they did in order to get into a place where they could live in idleness and eat the bread of charity. If they persist in that course they will be made to understand what the word ‘must’ means.”

His words were met with a round of applause…

Toward the end of its existence, the Lake Mohonk Conference began to turn its attention to the Indian situation in Oklahoma. With allotment and statehood, the tribal governments were now powerless and the utopia envisioned as coming about through privatization had not materialized. Instead, the non-Indians’ greed had no limits.  In 1914, Indian reformer Kate Barnard spoke to the group.  As a result both the Lake Mohonk Conference and the Board of Indian Commissioners began to work for increased federal protection for the Oklahoma tribes.

At the same time, the Lake Mohonk Conference embarked upon an anti-peyote campaign.  They suggested that the federal prohibition of intoxicating liquors be expanded to include peyote.  In this way more sanctions could be brought against the new Indian religious movement without the appearance of suppressing religion.

The last annual meeting of the Lake Mohonk Conference of the Friends of the Indian was held in 1916.  The conference organizer and resort owner, Albert Smiley, had died in 1912.  SOURCE

[[[Toward the end of the nineteenth century, the United States began to break up Indian reservations and open them up for non-Indian settlement. This was formalized with 1887 General Allotment Act (also known as the Dawes Act).  The idea of holding land in common was seen as uncivilized, un-Christian, and a barrier to civilization.  Indians were first encouraged and then required to obtain individual ownership of land.  The idea of owning land in severalty became almost an obsession of the late nineteenth century Christian reformers (such as the IRA).  They were convinced that such a policy would force the Indians to become more American.  Historian Clifford Trafzer, in his introduction to American Indians/American Presidents: A History, reports:  “By dividing tribal reservation lands into small parcels for individual Indians, reformers believed that allotment would imbue Native people with respect for private—rather the tribal—property, and help Indians assimilate into mainstream American culture.”  The result of this policy was to force American Indians into poverty and to create wealth for non-Indians. American capitalists and large corporations acquired Indian resources. LINK]]]

Thomas and Cora Bland with Red Cloud and interpreter named Randall***UPDATE:

I am still working on the paper about (my blood relative/distant cousin) Dr. Thomas Augustus Bland who published the COUNCIL FIRE and ARBITRATOR newsletter for Indians; his subscribers included Sitting Bull and Red Cloud, and other supporters of the Indian cause.  Drs. Thomas and Cora Bland, Alfred B. Meacham and others disagreed strongly with the IRA motives and instead created the National Indian Defense Association (NIDA) formed in 1885.  

Under the Blands guidance, The Council Fire became a much more radical publication meant for Indian people themselves.  Alfred B. Meacham and the Bland’s held to a radical minority position that was essentially in accord with the proposals brought to President Grant in 1869.   

The IRA approach to assimilation was grounded in the ideal of making good citizens of the so-called “undesirable” or “savage” class.  To these “friends of the indians” as a writer for The Council Fire sarcastically called them, “. . . the Indian was an obstacle . . . he must be got out of the way.” [1]

[1] George Manypenny, “How the Delawares Were Disinherited,” The Council Fire 9 (June 1886).

 

By way of a miracle, back in 2006 I had posted on rootsweb that I was doing research on Dr. Thomas A. Bland, and (SHOCK) on June 11, 2016 (ten years later) I was contacted by Daniel G., who lives in California, who sent me this stunning photo of Cora Bland (back left), Randall, the interpreter (back right), and seated Dr. Thomas Augustus Bland with Oglala Chief Red Cloud.  It is a BIG miracle because Dr. Charles Bland and I had never seen this photo before!

I knew it had to exist and viola, here it is! Dr. Bland did take Red Cloud to meet the Presidents of the United States! (Thank you Daniel)

ABOUT RED CLOUD

Lakota chief Red Cloud was an important figure in the 19th century land battle between Native Americans and the U.S. government. He successfully resisted developments of the Bozeman trail through Montana territory, and led the opposition against the development of a road through Wyoming and Montana for two years—a period that came to be known as Red Cloud’s War.  Red Cloud died in South Dakota in 1909.
Born in 1822 in what is now north-central Nebraska, Red Cloud (known in Lakota as Mahpíya Lúta) was an important Native American leader who fought to save his people’s lands.  His parents named him after an unusual weather event.  His mother, Walks as She Thinks, was a member of the Oglala Sioux and his father, Lone Man, was Brule Sioux. When he was around 5 years old, Red Cloud lost his father. Following his father’s death, Red Cloud was raised by his mother’s uncle, an Oglala Sioux leader named Smoke.  At a young age, Red Cloud sought to distinguish himself as a warrior. He demonstrated great bravery in the Oglalas’ battles with other tribes, including the Pawnees….Keep Reading

 

(Fancy Lake Mohonk Lodge) Finding more common ground with educators and religious leaders, Bishop Whipple lectured at national meetings, especially the Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the American Indian in upstate New York, where he met with leaders in the “Indian movement”.  Beginning in 1883, this annual meeting drew together philanthropists, educators, politicians, and others interested in the welfare of American Indians. Decisions made by conferees, who favored the assimilation of American Indians into mainstream society, influenced government policy, shaped the attitudes of many Americans, and drastically effected American Indian communities. New Paltz, NY, 19th Century Voices

 

(HA– these FRIENDS OF THE INDIANS really? They more like destroyed Indian culture, eroded sovereignty, wrote treaties they broke, created poverty culture, started the residential boarding schools where children died in the thousands, and created Third World death camps called Indian Reservations. With friends like that, who needs enemies?)

As soon as we get our paper done, I’ll post a link… xoxox

 

In my neck of the woods: Abenaki Captivity Narrative I found interesting here

 

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thunderheart movie still Kilmer and Trudell

The Power of John Trudell #BlueIndians

john trudell

James “Jimmy” Looks Twice in Thunderheart, played by John Trudell.

 

By Lara Trace (former editor of the Pequot Times 1999-2004)

It happened years ago… but I can still feel myself outside the Pequot Museum on a bench and the wind is really blowing and John is speaking about his album, and latest tour.

I knew I’d have to read what he said a few times after I listened to the tape I made.  John Trudell was deep, so deep, with level upon level of meaning in both his spoken words and lyrics.  I’d hear him, then I’d process more after a second or third listen… I can’t forget what he said about power and responsibility – you’ll read what he said in this interview.  With the next presidential election whirling around us, it’s hard not to feel powerless. But we are not powerless.

You all know John was an great actor. He was unforgettable in the movie THUNDERHEART.  (Top Photo.) I was lucky to interview him more than once.  (I spoke with him at the Honor the Earth powwow in 1999 in Wisconsin.)  John had a fiery spirit yet he was also fragile.  I felt good energy all around him; his strength was palpable.  After he lost his family, everyone wondered how he’d survive that, even years later. I don’t know how any human could survive intact after your entire family was killed by a house fire.  John did.  John mourned deeply and soared above loss.

From my notes, I was glad when Trudell explained how belief (as in religion belief) takes the place of thinking. I jotted in my notes, “Don’t believe – THINK.  We put a whole lot of energy into HOPE and BELIEF and that energy falls into a void and disappears…. You BELIEVE so you don’t have to think…… You HOPE so you don’t have to truly act – it’s a sedation (drug). Nothing changes, religion is brainwashing the consciousness of people desperate to believe…. this just puts the mind in a prison…

“Violence, terror and traumas has defeated tribal belief systems from tribal Europe thru today… and then the traumatized blame themselves….. and the beast continues to get bigger.  The answer is NON-COOPERATION and a clear thinking human being….”  Trudell didn’t waste any words.

The story I’d heard about Trudell (more than once) was he could walk into a group of angry white ranchers full of their prejudice about Indian people and they’d all walk out of the room with their arms over each others shoulders.  That was John.

Here’s what I wrote up back in 2000…

 

Trudell kicks off Pequot Museum concert series

Poet, activist, prophet, American Indian Movement (AIM) founder, actor and recording artist John Trudell (Santee), made a concert stop with his band Bad Dog, at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center in May (2000).

Trudell uses words as medicine, so his political and poetic abilities created the new album Blue Indians, on Dangerous Discs records, released in 1999, his ninth album, produced by Jackson Browne.

“I called the album Blue Indians because there is a kind of spiritual and cultural genocide perpetrated on everyone that is poor in this country,” Trudell said. “The advance of technology has put all of us on a kind of reservation.  These are the people who can’t educate their children, or afford health care. They’ve been robbed of life, which is what happened to Native people, so in that context, we’re all Indians.”

The “spoken word” artist said he didn’t set out to be a poet or writer.  After an unspeakable tragedy took the lives of his wife, Tina, their three children and Tina’s mother, back in 1979, he started writing.  The fire that killed them was declared an accident by the FBI who declined to investigate.  This happened just 12 hours after a group marched to FBI headquarters in Wash. DC, where Trudell delivered an address on the FBI’s war against Native Americans.  He burned an American flag in protest of racism and class injustice.  To this day, Trudell believes government operatives set the blaze, “It was murder. They were murdered as an act of war.”  [READ MORE ABOUT TINA]

After 1971, Native men and women formed the national American Indian Movement, in response to the horrific conditions on reservations and the many unsolved murders.  Trudell served as National AIM Chairman from 1973-79.  During that time the FBI compiled a 17,000 page file (covering Trudell’s activities from 1969-80).

Of some 60 pages obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, describing Trudell as a major threat to national security, the memo said, “Extremely eloquent – therefore extremely dangerous.”

Writing has helped Trudell keep some sanity and continue to survive.  In 1981, he published a book of poetry “Living in Reality” and by 1982 combined music and poetry, with the help of his musician friends Jackson Browne and future collaborator Jesse Ed Davis, a Kiowa from Oklahoma.

When asked how he deals with anger, Trudell told one reviewer, “I look at it as healthy.  It’s like sadness.  There’s a reason we’re given certain feelings. I think anger is necessary to our survival and reality, but now we live in a technology reality where people are programmed not to accept their anger.  I think we can use it as fuel for clarity, focus and accomplishment.  Anger doesn’t have to be a distorting experience.”

In May, the band played songs from the album Blue Indians, while Trudell spoke his poetic lyrics.  About promoting the album, he said later, “We don’t tour like other bands.  We hit the road sometimes for a week, or several weeks.  It’s more practical for us.”

I met John at LCO in 1999

I met John at LCO in 1999 and he signed it!

In concert, Trudell referred to humans as being mined, like resources, such as minerals, and reminded us we are indeed composed of the earth’s materials.  After the concert, he explained the effects of mining humans, “The feeling of powerlessness that this society has, I think is a result of mining humans because the people do feel powerless.  I think no clear, coherent thinking people, would accept as normal the conditions that they have to accept.  So, the only reason I can see that people would accept the inequities, are because they feel powerless to deal with them.  The powerlessness may disguise itself as rage, or racial hatred, or sexism, it may disguise itself in many ways, but basically the common thread is a feeling of powerlessness among the people.

“That means all the aggressive attitudes basically get internalized.  I think that’s the obvious result of being mined as an individual.  If they are being real with themselves, no pretending, no justification or rationalization, how many people feel that they have any real power?

“How many people feel powerless to deal with situations put in their life?  It’s got to do with perceptional reality.  If you use our intelligence as clearly and coherently as we can, I think we’d understand that we are not necessarily powerless.  But we don’t know how to relate to power, or recognize it, therefore we don’t know how to exercise it.”

And, Trudell said we can’t accept this idea of being mined because we can’t recognize it or see it.

“We’re not taught about our personal relationship to power.  We’re not taught about our relationship to the Great Spirit.  Recognizing power is what you have to do.  When you recognize it, you exercise it.

“You can’t take back what they have already taken but you can stop the taking of your power, once you recognize it.”

On the importance of prayer, John said he prays for balance.  “Prayer is often a misused word.  There are people who pray for things to make them happy so I don’t know if they’re really praying.  Then there are people who pray for the welfare of others.  Some people don’t pray so much for their own individualized ego, but understand that prayer is a way of thinking in harmony with the Creator.  Praying is a way of participating with the Creator.

“Prayer that is based upon thought and feeling, then that prayer is participating.  Prayer that is based upon need and emotion, that prayer is not participating in a synchronized manner, because it’s based on the ego’s need and emotion.”

“Responsibility is the way to fulfillment, when one recognizes and exercises their responsibility, this is how one is to be free.  It’s a way of reconnecting with power for us as humans.”

On his own life, Trudell said, “I see as clearly as I can. The objective is for me to be as real to myself as I can possibly be.  The more real I can be to myself, the more real maybe I can be to other people.  It’s a challenge.”

(Published in the Pequot Times.)

trudell truth trudell_no sense

 

We lost John in 2015.

Indian Country Today on John Trudell Legacy

This entire post is relevant to this quote:

Clarke quote

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all the real indians died off

I’m reading: Native American Cultural Appropriation Is a War of Meaning | Sioux Chef | Woven Tale Press | Mr. Hornaday’s War | Rape Culture

You may want to read them. I did! xox Lara Trace

FACE?

Such is the case with FACE, an F.B.I. program described in a new, blistering report from the United States Government Accountability Office. FACE stands for Facial Analysis, Comparison, and Evaluation, the name of a relatively new unit within the agency. The G.A.O. found that the F.B.I. has been disregarding some of even the most basic privacy protections and standards. Keep Reading

 

Appropriation?

Excerpt:

In Indian country, there is a saying that being Indian is not about what you claim, but who claims you.

Dan Snyder’s grandstanding about the offensive team name is a joke that would be funny if it weren’t so serious for what it means to U.S. American national culture and how it contributes to the common misunderstandings of average Americans. In our upcoming book, “All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths about Native Americans, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and I devote two entire chapters to the controversies surrounding appropriation of Native American cultures.  We discuss the Washington Redsk*ns team name in depth and the broader topic of Native American team mascots in one chapter, and in another we tackle other facets of appropriation including Halloween costumes, spirituality, and identity.  Look for the book’s release this October. (TOP PHOTO)

About the Author 

image from www.beaconbroadside.comDina Gilio-Whitaker (Colville Confederated Tribes) is an independent writer and researcher in Indigenous studies, having earned a bachelor’s degree in Native American Studies and a master’s degree in American Studies from the University of New Mexico, and also holds the position of research associate and associate scholar at the Center for World Indigenous Studies. Her work focuses on issues related to Indigenous nationalism, self-determination, and environmental justice, and more recently the emerging field of critical surf studies. She is a co-author (with Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz) of the forthcoming book from ‘All the Real Indians Died Off’ and 20 Other Myths about Native Americans. An award-winning journalist, she is a frequent contributor to Indian Country Today Media Network and Native Peoples Magazine. Follow her on Twitter at @DinaGWhit and visit her website.

via Native American Cultural Appropriation Is a War of Meaning – Beacon Broadside: A Project of Beacon Press

 

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Creative and Tasty Lakota Food?? HECK YEAH!

Sean Sherman, who opened a business called The Sioux Chef this fall, is an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota tribe and grew up on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

 

READ THIS INTERVIEW

 

 

 

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Art, Coffee, Tea and Blogs

Woven Tale Press: Art, Coffee, Tea and Blogs

After coming across this first link from the Google Cultural Institute, I thought I’d take a look at some interesting art this time.

https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/project/art-camera

The ultra definition in these works is incredible. Working with museums around the world, Google has used its Art Camera system to capture the finest details of artworks from their collection.


Next up is a unique way to work with color. And if you have the money, yeah I know I’m talking to artists, go here. If not enjoy the link

James Turrell Allowing Limited Visitors to Roden Crater for $6,500 a Person


This past month I was sidelined from working for awhile so I had the time to explore and download a new library of art catalogs. Create your own library from this extensive list.

http://www.openculture.com/2015/03/download-422-free-art-books-from-the-metropolitan-museum-of-art.html


This article is a bit older but the voices in it are more than worth listening to. so enjoy what women artists have to say across a number of generations.

Women in the Art World


Mr. Hornaday’s War: The Return of the Buffalo

…But Hornaday, always quirky, difficult, and relentlessly persistent, did not stop there. He’d always been a man who loved a good fight (he even fought with his friends), so he went to war on behalf of the bison. As time went on, Hornaday became one of the noisiest, angriest, and most unstoppable conservationists of his day, second only to his friend and colleague Theodore Roosevelt. He was the founder of the National Zoo in Washington, and for thirty years served as director of the Bronx Zoo—sorry, he hated that name, insisting on “The New York Zoological Park”—a soapbox from which he lectured, cajoled, lambasted, and wheedled the American public, the Congress, and anybody else who would listen about the alarming state of the “the grandest quadruped [he had] ever seen.” He also initiated captive breeding programs at the zoo, to see if it were possible, first, and if so, to rebuild the perilously depleted population. With Roosevelt, Hornaday created the American Bison Society, dedicated to bison conservation. And he began fighting to create wild reserves in the west, to give the buffalo a place to roam should their numbers recover.

In his “spare time,” Hornaday also wrote a raft of books about zoology and conservation, fought lax game laws and gun manufacturers, and became a major player in the “Plume Wars” against feathered hat dealers, who were ravaging rookeries in the Everglades and other wild places. He was a vigilante for justice for the animals, a political agitator for the natural world, a man who never knew how to keep quiet in the face of what he considered to be a monstrous crime in progress.  Keep Reading

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RAPE CULTURE – I have no words to add… read this…

For most of human history, women and children have been treated as possessions of men—as economic assets, trophies, slave labor, and objects of sexual gratification—rather than full persons with preferences and rights, starting with control of our own bodies. This view is so deeply embedded in culture that the concept of sexual consent is wholly absent from the Bible, which continues to profoundly shape modern culture. In Bible texts, virgin females are given in marriage by their fathers, traded as slaves, kept as war booty, and sold as damaged goods to men who have raped them.  The Quran is no better.  This month, Pakistan’s Council of Islamic Ideology proposed legislation giving men the legal right to beat their wives “lightly,” as taught by the Prophet.  A teen who turned down a marriage proposal was tortured and then burned alive by the family of the rejected man, who felt entitled to her. KEEP READING

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That’s what I’m reading and processing. How about you?

Stolen Generations is here

See you next week… Lara/Trace

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people's history_Zinn

What VERSION are you reading?

By Lara Trace Hentz  (history buff)

 

Wounded Knee Media Coverage (New Film: Line in the Sand by Kevin McKiernan

EXAMPLE  http://listen.sdpb.org/post/dakota-midday-wounded-knee-line-sand#stream/0

Years ago I realized the “version” is what we need to examine as much as the writing itself.  It’s very very important to look at WHO wrote it and why.  Ellowyn in Pine Ridge, South Dakota shared her tribe’s version of history that differed greatly from American textbooks.  That version of my education began in early 1990s in her kitchen.

In Pine Ridge, it’s usually by 4th grade the student turns off and loses interest, Ellowyn told me.  (She was a teacher.)  The Lakota do not believe what is in the American textbook because their history is left out.  She thinks (as do many in her Oglala tribe) that it’s important history is taught at home. It’s oral.  It’s not written down.  (If you google Oglala Lakota history, it’s generally written by the non-Indian and not accepted by the Oglala.)

My anthropologist sister Dr. Raeschelle Deimel in Vienna Austria and I were also discussing education a few days ago.  (She teaches college-level history.) It’s obvious certain “subjects” (like history) are a matter of importance and priority for governments who control our education and what version we get.  Not only do they control what we learn but how much, when we learn it, and there is no legal enforcement to measure accuracy or honesty, obviously.

Do parents have a say in what children learn?  Yes, kinda.  (If you teach at home, choose the version and control the story yourself).  (Top Photo:  Rae sent me this book and said it’s very important all Americans read it.)  I plan to spend my summer reading Zinn ingesting every chapter. I am still a history student on my own.

We in America don’t even recognize the agenda and propaganda in our history textbooks, Rae said.

Sadly too many Americans have turned their backs on history, we decided.  Probably too boring.  If you went to college you might choose a certain period of history to study in depth.  (That would also depend on which professor you get and how good they are.)  Now we think it’s a general lack of interest and disgust, as in “what good is history?” to make my life or salary better… or maybe deep down we sixth-sense we’re learning bullshit (?) – perhaps.

c4cebe7e3a9bf5d636b4a784167434b41716b42It surprised me when I learned from a German journalist Monique in Munich in 2005 that Americans know more about the Nazis than the Germans do.  History again is used as a tool, or it’s not used at all.  Why would the Germans suppress their own history? She said they don’t have museums to teach any version of their own Nazi history.  REALLY!  (Of course she told me she and other Germans do learn about it on their own.  Many of their parents were sent to the Hitler’s Youth Camps and were indoctrinated with propaganda.) History/story used as mind control? She said yes.

What I learned in my Catholic grade school happened over two straight days watching Germany’s Holocaust films on concentration camps when I was in 4th grade.  I now realize how disturbing it was for me to see that as a kid.  The nuns warned us but didn’t give us an option to leave the classroom.  I choked back tears and nearly threw up. I had nightmares for months.

Much later as an adult I studied WWII and the Nazis on my own, watching documentaries especially.  (We called it my scary Nazi phase.) I needed to understand HOW people could be this way and why. It took me many years to see WHO was behind the genocide of American Indians, and Jews, and many other ethnic minority groups and WHAT they ultimately wanted: domination and land, mostly.  READ a historic SOLUTION BY GABOR MATE

Today of course I question everything I read.  My two granddaughters deserve better than what their history textbooks will teach them.  It’s my job and it’s going to have to come from me.  Oral history, at home, in my kitchen.

 

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” –George Santayana (16 December 1863 in Madrid, Spain – 26 September 1952 in Rome, Italy) was a philosopher, essayist, poet and novelist.

History is so peculiar, right?  You can look and look –and read and read — and find only glimmers of truth.  “Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it.” It was someone who told me to look at it as His = Story (Chapter 19 Surprises in Zinn’s book is an eye-opener on Indian Country history. I humbly suggest you spend some time this summer with Zinn’s book or watch him on youtube, if you haven’t already.

 

Read this blog too! Dr. Stuart Bramhall is brilliant HERE

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THIS VIDEO simply blew my mind :  please take an hour and listen to Biology of Belief:

f24c8-adoption-visa_200x200

 

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Dealing with adoption propaganda is also a full-time job for some of us…

The war on human trafficking and adoption ebbs and flows…blogs come and go… and here’s a brilliant post from 2013:

From Transracial Eyes blog:

Elsewhere on the site we have explored the “cost” of adoptee activism [ link ], and we have heard some stories of closed-down blogs and the like.  Certain adoptee sites have erased past posts …  (My dear friend Von experienced this censorship with Blogger when her earlier site was taken down. FBI, really?)

Source: The Adoption Mafia.

and HERE

Taking advantage of poor vulnerable families is a crime.  Adoption Agencies are wolves in sheep clothing.

Adoption is really taking children from the poor and giving to the rich.  Adoption Trafficking is coercive language that in the end, the person of ‘power’  manipulates the vulnerable parent, typically the mother, out of her child.  The end goal is to fulfill the demand of wanting infertile adopters and financially benefiting the industry.  The adoption fees are disguised as the costs to ‘process’ the child for adoption and can cost as high as $60,000+ for each transaction.  It’s modern day, 21st century, legalized child trafficking.  Think of how much that $60,000 could help a community in Uganda, China, India keeping families together.  Instead it’s an undercurrent of corruption in foreign countries all happening from the demand of rich Westerners.  The middle man (adoption agencies) strips away the true identity of the child and the adopter buys the child, so he or she will become one of their ‘own’.  In the adopters minds they may think of it as saving an ‘orphan’ or a ‘solution for infertility issues’, but there is strategic modern day ‘verbiage’ agencies use, social workers, lawyers or counselors (or anyone working for the adoption industry) to manipulate young mothers out of their children and that took decades to perfect.

Trafficking in Africa (2016)

2016: Fake passport used to take adopted child Home

For more news on industry practices, go to Adoptionland.org

adoptionlandTo get a copy of Adoptionland: From Orphans to Activists visit here. (I am in this book)

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I know my views on adoption are controversial. Hey, read me anyway. You might learn something… true?

 

 

If any reader wishes to read Stolen Generations in exchange for an honest review on Amazon, I will email you the pdf or epub. Email me: larahentz@yahoo.com.  No strings attached.

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Ghosts

ZOOLOOZ STORE OWNER

Me in my store Zoolooz in Portland, Oregon (1990) – yes that is a blow up shark!

By Lara Trace (called Lala by her sister in Austria)

Am I the only one?

 

Every. SINGLE. DAY…  I feel like I’m overreacting to an insane horror flick.  YEEGADS, what the hell is going on in this world?  It’s like a very very very bad movie, between X RATED and profane.  If I turn on the TV I end up swearing like a sailor.  (I do get fined $$ when I swear.) Don’t hand me that TV remote. I’ll end up watching Ancient Aliens as a marathon again.

(We had a freak meteor shower on May 17 and I still have insomnia.)

The photo is me when I had a store in Portland in the late 80s.  Yes, I liked and sold crazy shit. Yes, that is a blow up shark, dinosaur and cactus. I am eccentric. I still like crazy shit, though I don’t have those blowups anymore.

OH, the new book STOLEN GENERATIONS is out and it’s doing well.  I did a radio interview (see link below)

Something I’m working on… I am doing a talk in San Diego in a few weeks with other adoptees.

Here are some basics:

If the Native population was just 2 million and one quarter of all children were removed before the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, then (on-paper) 80,000+ children were removed from their families during the early to mid-1900s. If the population was 3 million, then over 100,000 were removed and so on…

I did pretend to be someone – and live a lie – because I’m adopted.  Ask any adoptee who has Native American ancestry.  If you are not told, you’re just another dead Indian, at least on record or on tribal rolls.

America is like that.  Adoptees, of all skin colors in the United States, are now estimated to number between six and ten million.  They’d prefer every one of us to live as an American citizen as if none other were as good or as important.  America forgets it’s very new by all standards; it just acts like its old.

Indian Country is ancient.  Our cells are identical to those of our ancestors of 30,000 years ago.  Indian kids who are adopted and raised outside Indian country eventually get it – more or less.  We get that less Indians around is best.  We get that America didn’t respect us or our culture.  We get that America tamed us, stole our land, and revised our history.  We get that more Americans prefer us tucked away somewhere.  They’ll teach us their version of our story.  We get that it’s wrong, but it’s America (or Canada).  It’s been this way a long time.

(Thirty+ years ago I opened my adoption.  Having to start this story somewhere, I started with a chronology, first the steps, opening my adoption, how I handled it, good, bad, etc.  It seemed to take forever.  What I encountered – besides shock – was me, barely alive, what I’d call living dead.  Let me explain.  I started to see that I was usually caught up in other people’s lives just to avoid living my own.  Under layers of denial, I conveniently forgot what I didn’t like to remember.  I had stopped caring about the past but it had me, all of me.)

No one is exactly sure how many Indian children were taken, but thousands are gone, probably living on the fringe as an urban Indian. That is how I see myself.

[Adrian who is my brother sent me this:  One can never tame that which is genetically wild and free…..
 Like the WolfDogs I love and raise,they adapt to me out of love and pack mentality….,But they will always be Wolves and if not respected as such, will turn back to that which they are genetically,born to be……………We are like The Wolves.]

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And here’s what is happening up north – my 60s Scoop brothers and sisters are leading the way… (top photo of Solidarity Rally)

via Open Letter to Prime Minister Trudeau Call for Action for ‘60s Scoop Adoptees | Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare

The history of the United States and its treatment of American Indians is very similar to Canada’s history in that there was a “necessity”, from the Federal Government’s standpoint, to deal with Indian Tribes for treaties to keep the “Peace” and to gain “Dominion” over Indian lands so that the Federal Government could carry out the theory/doctrine of “Manifest Destiny”. Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/05/22/non-status-indians-us-part-2-daniels-v-canadacrown

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My recent interview with Native Solidarity:  https://soundcloud.com/user-633130202/trace-hentz-interview

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Leland and I will be in San Diego. He gave Stolen Generations to a Hopi Federal Judge in Boston recently.

Leland and I will be giving a talk in San Diego. He gave Stolen Generations to a Hopi Federal Judge in Boston recently. He’s a great guy and Navajo adoptee- actor-jewelry designer!

Hey, your blogs are wonderful, by the way.  I’ve been reading you all like I’m holding onto you for dear life.

I will be back… as in writing again mid-June. I’m here in spirit.  Like a ghost.

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Photo Album | 2016 Rally and Social

This happened. I wasn’t there in body but in spirit.

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network

We would like to share some photos from our 2016 Parliament Hill Rally and Social!

A very big THANK YOU to our Elders, speakers and volunteers!

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: New anthology sheds new light on the STOLEN GENERATIONS

The new book STOLEN GENERATIONS finally hit on Amazon!

Blue Hand Books Collective

Published 4-20-16 Published 4-20-16

Greenfield, Massachusetts [2016]  — Award-winning Native journalist Trace Hentz continues her heart-rending efforts to peel away the malodorous layers of Native American adoption with her newest book, Stolen Generations: Survivors of the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop (Publisher Blue Hand Books).

“What is significant about this new book?  Everything,” Hentz said.  “Ten years ago there were no books on stolen generations.  Now we have more than one generation who have experienced the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop.  These survivors have bravely documented their life experience in their own words in three anthologies (Two Worlds, Called Home and now Stolen Generations) that I’ve compiled so far.”

Hentz (formerly DeMeyer) has worked tirelessly since 2004 to shed light on the dark corners and secret crevices of American Indian adoptions, and by extension, all adoptees.

“For me, that is all I hoped for, prayed for,” Hentz said.  An…

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wwilsonAIR

Blog Bonus: Native American Photogs

NEW UK EXHIBIT: STILL – Native American Photographers

15th March – 28 May, 2016 (RAINMAKER Gallery is the UK showcase for contemporary Native North American Indian art and jewellery.)

RAINMAKER GALLERY, 123 Coldharbour Road, Bristol BS6 7SN, UK

Artist’s Talk with Cara Romero, Thursday April 21st, 3pm-4pm
Artists’ reception with Cara Romero and Diego Romero, Thursday April 21st, 6pm -8pm

STILL showcases the recent work of fine art photographers Cara Romero, Will Wilson, Kali Spitzer, Robert Mesa and Zoe Urness.  Their compelling photographic images of water, dance and stillness explore concepts of suspension and continuance in a rapidly changing world.

Global changes in climate, environment and economies have impacted significantly in the most vulnerable areas of the world, and Indigenous North Americans see these effects daily.  Chemehuevi artist Cara Romero draws these delicate relationships to a fine point in her series ‘Water Memories’. Her breathtaking underwater images expose the fragile and essential relationships that exist between people, water and life. These beautifully conceived photographs show an immersed environment where the Native American figures are portrayed under the surface, suspended in a drowned landscape.

“‘Water Memories’ are photography dreamscapes dealing with Native American relationships to water, the forces of man and of Mother Nature.  They are individual explorations of space, memory, and diverse Indigenous narratives that are both terrifying and peaceful.” Cara Romero

TOP PHOTO: Distinguished Diné artist Will Wilson’s tranquil, panoramic self-portrait captures a prayer offering by the lone figure of the artist within a vast waterscape. 

Since 2005, I have been creating a series of artworks entitled ‘Auto Immune Response’ (AIR), which takes as its subject the quixotic relationship between a post-apocalyptic Diné (Navajo) man and the devastatingly beautiful, but toxic environment he inhabits.  The series is an allegorical investigation of the extraordinarily rapid transformation of Indigenous lifeways, the dis-ease it has caused, and strategies of response that enable cultural survival.Will Wilson

From his on going series ‘Critical Indigenous Photographic Exchange’ (CIPX), Wilson uses the early photographic technique of tintype to present modern static images of dancers in an historic fluid medium.

Kali Spitzer (Kaska Dena / Jewish) also experiments with the wet plate alchemical process of tintype producing magical and magnificent portraits of contemporary Indigenous women who appear as if through an antique mirror. Navajo photographer Robert I Mesa  captures fleeting moments of inter-tribal pow wow with his incandescent portraits of Fancy Dancers. Zoe Marieh Urness (Tlingit & Cherokee) creates timeless sepia toned portraits of Indigenous landscapes containing contemporary Native Americans still ‘Keeping The Traditions Alive’.

This exhibition presents technically and aesthetically brilliant images that together speak of the strong identities, cultures and connections to Mother Earth still thriving at the heart of Indigenous communities. 

STILL is curated by Dr Stephanie Pratt (Dakota) and Joanne Prince Director of Rainmaker Gallery

To book for the Artist’s Talk with Cara Romero please contact the gallery. The talk will take place at Redland Quaker Meeting House, 126 Hampton Rd. BS6 6JE. The cost is £7 per person.

Further talks will be held at The American Museum In Britain with both Cara Romero and Diego Romero on the 20th and 22nd April respectively.

SOURCE:
===LAST YEAR

Debra Yepa-Pappan’s work

‘CAPTURED’ showcases the work of fine art photographers Cara Romero, Will Wilson, Zoe Urness, Sara Sense, Tailinh Agoyo and Debra Yepa-Pappan, who surprise and delight with sublime and arresting imagery that challenges preconceived notions of American Indians.
Their post on Captured exhibit in 2015: HERE
=====
AND meet a friend of mine Chris Pappan

Chris Pappan, his wife Debra Yepa-Pappan and their daughter JiHae visited Bristol for the opening of their exhibition FIRST PEOPLE, SECOND CITY co-curated by Dr Max Carocci from the British Museum and Joanne Prince, Director of Rainmaker Gallery.

Artist’s Statement:

I am an American Indian. I am Osage, Kaw, Cheyenne River Sioux, and mixed European heritage.
I don’t walk in beauty, I just try not to step in dog shit.
I don’t listen to the wind, I listen to people’s cell phone conversations.
I go to Pow Wows to celebrate a pan-Indian culture.
I don’t walk the Red Road, I walk down Kedzie Boulevard. I live 20 feet above the earth.
I listen to Norwegian Black Metal and 70’s Prog Rock.
I need to learn the language of my people.
I make paintings to bring awareness that Indians are still here.
I distort images because people perceive a distorted image of Native Americans in the collective conscience.
I prefer the term Indian over Native American, but I use both.
I wonder why many people want to know what “percentage” Indian I am.
I am blessed in that I don’t know anyone who is currently addicted to drugs, been a victim of domestic violence or committed suicide.
I am blessed in that I have a loving wife and beautiful daughter.
I am an American Indian living in the 21st century.

 

(Indians are also known for their good-hearted goofiness, like Chris obviously… Lara/Trace)

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