Parole denied and denied and denied, Peltier waits for justice

Recent tweet:

Hey everyone.  I promised to post this interview with Leonard Peltier once I found it!  It’s still making news that Peltier supporters are demanding his release. (see Incident at Oglala documentary by Robert Redford)

My interview with him was published in 1998 in News From Indian Country newspaper and in print by the Peltier Defense Committee (LPDC).

I interviewed this political prisoner  while he was still an inmate in Leavenworth, a federal prison in Kansas.  …I do recall I was very very nervous… I remember Leonard told me, “Write a good story.”

My interview was done over the phone at his Defense Committee Office in Kansas.  Peltier called us (at least 4 times) and I did my best to take notes, holding the phone on my shoulder.   Right after we spoke, Peltier lost phone privileges because of the actor Steven Seagal, who planned to play Leonard in a new movie (which didn’t happen.)  I actually went to the scene in Oglala shooting, after this interview.  It’s remote, and there are no traces of this deadly gun battle.  (My former boss DeMain contends Peltier admitted to others he had shot the agents.) This gun battle was war, and there were casualties. No one in the federal government was indicted for the deaths of AIM members.

Today, Leonard Peltier is 71 years old and he has served 40 years in prison in a case that has long raised troubling questions—including from the judge who heard his appeal.  It’s reported that Peltier has an abdominal aortic aneurysm, and his health is deteriorating rapidly.  “If properly treated, Leonard could make a full recovery, but if the aneurysm ruptures, he has roughly a 10% chance of survival.”

He is called the world’s most famous prisoner of war.  (Three years ago Leonard wrote and asked me to email him. He was hoping to raise funds for his legal team.)

 

by Trace A. DeMeyer — Lawrence, Kansas (ICC/1998)

Imagine spending 8,030 days in prison for a crime you did not commit.  Imagine having a botched surgery that causes excruciating jaw pain, yet prison officials refuse corrective surgery with the specialist you need.  Leonard Peltier says he knows he is innocent, and wants surgery, yet he waits.

Speaking by phone from the federal prison Leavenworth, KS, on June 24, Leonard Peltier (Lakota/Ojibway) talked about the life he has and the one he hopes for, while waiting for a Presidential pardon for the murders of two FBI agents at the Jumping Bull Compound on June 26, 1975, 23 years ago.

Ramsey Clark, Peltier’s attorney, hoped new medical evidence introduced at a May 4th parole hearing, would secure his release, but parole was denied. Clark is still waiting for the official reasons in a formal statement from the parole commission.

“I have medical problems,” Peltier said. “My jaw is stuck open 1/4 inch and I can’t chew properly. I have to mash food with my tongue. Even though I have asked for a special diet, sugar free, they’ve refused me and the commissary doesn’t have anything.” Peltier worries about the effects on his health, including inadequate digestion.

The Leonard Peltier Defense Committee has found three doctors who would perform corrective surgery at no charge, but prison officials have denied all requests. The pain in his jaw never subsides, he said.

“Dr. Keller, a specialist at the Mayo Clinic, believes he can operate and correct my jaw condition,” Peltier said. He underwent two major surgeries in Springfield Hospital for Federal Prisoners on Feb. 8 and May 3, 1996. Neither were successful.

Even though Peltier cannot fully close his mouth, prison officials still order Peltier to work making furniture at Leavenworth. His mouth is aggravated by the sawdust.

Every six months, prisoners are given new work assignments. “Tell the public I have no choice about where I work, clearly a violation of my rights.”

 

1972 (WIKI PHOTO)

At the Leonard Peltier Defense Committee (LPDC) office/apartment in Lawrence, Leonard’s paintings hang brightly on the walls, a constant presence for his busy support group. “I paint every night,” Peltier said. “It’s what I enjoy.” He then donates his artwork to the Defense Committee. They sell them to pay for his defense and build a bank account for Leonard and his family.

“A support group in California regularly exhibits my best paintings. With the money they raise, they plan to build a house in Pine Ridge – a museum for my art,” Leonard explained.

Leonard would paint all day if he could. “I need pictures of people and places to paint,” he said.  Prison regulations prohibit Polaroid snap-shots. “I can accept art supplies from an art supply store, not from individuals who mail them to me.”  He hopes to receive paints (acrylics or oils), canvas, and brushes. “Order them at the supply store and have the company send it to me,” he said. He also buys supplies from the prison commissary.

Money for art supplies must be postal money orders or Western Union money grams.  Direct them to Leonard Peltier, Prisoner#89637-132, Box 1000, Leaven-worth, KS, 66048. Prison regulations do not allow postage stamps or cash.***

On May 4, Peltier had a statutory interim hearing which prison authorities are required to give to “old law” prisoners every two years. “This means that by law they are required to review me for parole every two years, though in no way are they required to actually ever grant me parole. After my team and I had made our oral and written presentations, the parole examiner attempted, unsuccessfully, to get me to admit that I had fired on the agents.”

Peltier said when this did not work, the examiner reviewed the documents on the basis of his urgent medical need. The examiner then left the room. About 45 minutes later, Peltier says, “He again tried to get me to admit to shooting the agents. My attorney and I now know the reason behind this. As I had suspected, they cannot legally keep me in prison this long for aiding and abetting, and they do not have enough evidence to keep me on the grounds of first degree murder.”

Leonard remembers, “The examiner then said, ‘We do not know who is responsible for killing our agents. Someone on that reservation killed those agents and since you were convicted, you’ll serve the time.’”

At the hearing, the parole examiner told them that one of the agent’s wives had contacted him and said she wants Peltier to die in prison. Peltier does not believe it. “That letter may have been false.”

Leonard said the parole examiner ended by saying, “You do not come for re-consideration for parole until the year 2008. This is not a parole date. When 2008 arrives, we will take it from there.”

Peltier believes “what the government and the parole board were saying is that they intend for me to die in prison.”

In 1976, Peltier’s colleagues, Dino Butler and Robert Robideau, were acquitted of murder charges based on evidence they acted in self-defense.  The case against Theodore Eagle, also at the shootout and charged with murder, was dropped for lack of evidence.  In Peltier’s case, only limited evidence was heard, as ordered by Judge Paul Benson.  Historical background on Pine Ridge violence, persecution of AIM by the FBI, the Robideau or Butler verdict in Cedar Rapids, or testimony in that trial, was not allowed, nor was contradicting evidence given by FBI agent Gary Adams. With the court case and appeals process formally closed, Clark, former Attorney General in the Lyndon Johnson administration, has said, “the evidence that convicted Peltier doesn’t exist, and the prosecutor admits the government doesn’t know who killed two of its FBI agents.”

 

Clemency and Senate hearings

On June 27, a demonstration for Leonard was held in Washington, DC, to pressure the government for clemency and to open Senate hearing investigations. Peltier says he is building a new legal team to open and fight the case, using new evidence to finally prove his innocence. He said LPDC supporters are building a research team of college students and law graduates. He urgently asks that the public support their work. Leonard directs the LPDC office daily by phone. He says the defense committee does all the paralegal work for the attorneys.

“After hearing for themselves, during the parole review, how their judicial system treats me, my legal team is outraged and have now committed themselves to taking legal action. They are working pro-bono, but research and expenses are still covered by donations.”

Despite sounding calm, Peltier admits his frustration and anger. “I have my moments. We now know for a fact that two weeks prior to the shootout at the compound, they planned to come in and kill everybody. They were declaring war against the Lakota people. The documents are there.

“I know in my heart I’m not guilty of anything.  The parole examiner said I’m guilty of aiding and abetting. Who was I aiding and abetting? They cannot keep me here. It’s a violation of international law. I’m not guilty of murder.”

Referring to Peter Mathiesson’s book In the Spirit of Crazy Horse, Peltier said, “Duane Brewer said, ‘We were financed by the government and given the green light to go in.’”  Duane Brewer headed the Pine Ridge Tribal Police Force, also known as Dickie Wilson’s GOON Squad.

According to the LPDC May/June 1998 newsletter, there are over 20 million signatures on Free Leonard Peltier petitions sent to the White House and to the Pardon Attorney. A Presidential Pardon or a new trial are his only hope.

What will Peltier do once he secures his freedom? The phone line went quiet as he thought for a moment. “I want to build a life for my two grandchildren. I want to help them, build them a home. I want a home base, and then build an international network and be useful to the Indian movement.” He also wants time with his five children. Peltier will be 54 on September 12. He says his hair is turning gray. He’s losing vision in one eye.

“Write a good story so that people will understand.  Ask them to get involved.  Tell them my case is still ongoing.  A presidential campaign is coming up.  Political campaigns always involve money.  The tribes can help me there.  Go and ask questions.

“Too many people gossip that we are doing alright with gaming when in truth we have the worst poverty in the US at Pine Ridge.  I want to clear up all these misconceptions about Indian people.  There is an Indian problem, and it’s not one we created.

“I have faith and hope in my people.  I hope that I can get out and leave a legacy beneficial to my people.  I want to help.  The grassroots movement by indigenous people has been building and spreading to an enormous level, so how is it the President’s Initiative on Race doesn’t include us?  I find that very racist.”

It’s hard to imagine Peltier in prison in 2008 for a crime he didn’t commit.  He’d be 64 years old.

*************************

 

***Remember Peltier is no longer in Leavenworth…

Send Cards and Letters:

Leonard Peltier
#89637-132
USP Coleman I
P.O. Box 1033
Coleman, FL 33521

I uploaded the Ramsey Clark speech I transcribed in 1997 at academia.edu which is a close look at the FBI and the insufficient evidence that convicted Peltier. READ HERE

Visit the 2016 clemency campaign for Leonard Peltier hosted by Amnesty International – USA and get involved:

Take Action: Ask President Obama to Grant Leonard Clemency
Take Action: Download a 1 page action sheet
Take Action: Grant Clemency to Leonard Peltier
Read More: Download the Issue Brief on Leonard Peltier’s case

Films

Jackson Browne and Bruce Cockburn performs at the “Bring Leonard Peltier Home 2012” Concert at The Beacon Theatre on December 14th, 2012 in New York City. Bobby Bank/WireImage

 

ROLLING STONE 2012:

 

Six presidents have held office since Peltier’s conviction.

“If not you, President Obama, who?” activist filmmaker Michael Moore asked as he addressed the crowd. “All the wrong people are in prison in this country. As an American, this is not how I want to be remembered. And so I think that we have a much larger job: We have to get Leonard out of prison immediately.”

Seeger returned to the stage and was joined by the night’s performers for the show closer, “Bring Him Home,” which Seeger adapted from his Vietnam War protest song, “Bring ’Em Home.”

 

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“When You Dial 911 and Wall Street Answers”: How Private Equity Profits off Our Daily Lives | Democracy Now!

When you woke up this morning, chances are your morning routine was touched in some way by a private equity firm.  From the water you drink to the roads you drive to work, to the morning newspaper you read, Wall Street firms are playing an increasingly influential role in daily life.  So says a compelling new article in The New York Times, “This Is Your Life, Brought to You by Private Equity.” For more, we speak with New York Times reporter Danielle Ivory, one of the contributors to the series as well as co-author of the recent article “When You Dial 911 and Wall Street Answers.”

Source: “When You Dial 911 and Wall Street Answers”: How Private Equity Profits off Our Daily Lives | Democracy Now!

Seventh Fire: Open Roads and Dead Ends on a Native American Reservation (FILM)

PHOTO: A scene from The Seventh Fire, executive produced by Terrence Malick ’65 and directed by Jack Pettibone Riccobono ’03, premiering July 22 in New York City at the Metrograph | Photograph courtesy of Film Movement

by Sophia Nguyen | HARVARD MAGAZINE 7.22.16

The Seventh Fire opens with an image of a road in the dark, pulling the audience into a harsh and little-seen world: the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota. The documentary’s 71 minutes are largely confined to the town of Pine Point, and its grim sights: houses covered in boards and graffiti, kids doing drugs, a car ablaze in the street. There seems to be no way out, least of all for the film’s central characters. Rob Brown, a onetime leader of the Native Gangster Disciples, confronts his violent past as he prepares for his fifth stay in prison. Meanwhile, Kevin Fineday Jr., a teenager who looks up to Brown, is beginning to be drawn into gang life.

Director Jack Pettibone Riccobono ’03, director of The Seventh Fire Photograph courtesy of Film Movement

 

Director Jack Pettibone Riccobono ’03 first went to the White Earth reservation while working on a short film about an Ojibwe community’s fight against genetic modifications to wild rice. When he became interested in the spread of gangs on Native American reservations, a professor at the tribal college introduced him to Brown, then a student in her sociology class. Brown had a troubled history, including 39 foster homes, three group homes, and 12 years in prison. He also had dreams of being a published writer.

“It was apparent right away that Rob was an amazing presence,” says Shane Slattery-Quintanilla ’04, a writer, producer, and cinematographer for the film. “He was clearly someone you could collaborate with, as opposed to just document.”

Brown and Fineday became the filmmakers’ liaisons to the town’s criminal element.  (“I didn’t know I was a lifesaver until I had the responsibility to keep these guys alive on the rez,” Brown later joked at a special screening at the White House last March.) They also let the camera into their homes, with their friends and families offering up wry, candid assessments: “With Rob, there’s always a new low,” his brother observes. As a result, scenes of addiction and fistfights are followed by ones of vulnerable tenderness, as a mother cradles her newborn in the hospital, or Rob’s young daughter shyly turns away from the camera to take a phone call from her father, calling from jail.

Even as events jump across months and even years, the narrative seems to move only in fits and starts, with little momentum. There is no obvious path forward for these men, only dead ends and cycles of violence. The characters narrate their predicaments with matter-of-fact lucidity. “I’m still debating, man,” Fineday tells the filmmakers. “I still have the idea of being a big-time drug-dealer…but I wanna get a job and do sh-t somewhat the right way.” He just needs to get started, or something, he explains—but on which path, he doesn’t make clear. In another scene, Brown reviews his plea agreement with a self-ironizing fluency—“Convicted, convicted…looks like they missed something on that DWI, in 2004, huh? ’Cause they could’ve used that for a first-degree.” Neither sees himself as a victim of circumstance. But as events in the older man’s history repeat in his protégé’s—pregnant girlfriends, diluted dope, tearful phone calls with fathers—there’s an overwhelming sense that their lives are becalmed.

The Seventh Fire shows more than it tells; it also knows more than what it chooses to present. The filmmakers sat down with gang members, community leaders, Native activists, prison wardens, and special Native gang investigators at the Department of Corrections, but chose not to include such interviews in the film itself. Larger historical forces shadow the documentary, never explicitly outlined but powerfully felt, constraining the lives of the characters. The camera keeps an intent, intimate focus on Brown and Fineday.

Persephone Ann Brown (right) talks with her cousin Bonita Brown in a scene from The Seventh Fire. Jack Riccobono, Courtesy of Seventh Fire LLC

“We wanted to create a film that was built around real people, and we never set out to pretend that we were making this authoritative film on Native American life,” says Slattery-Quintanilla.

Riccobono explains the approach this way: “We hope that the film can be received on different levels—that it might serve as a gateway for people who don’t know so much about this history, and for those who do know things about the boarding school era, and land allotment-policies, and the influence of Christian missionaries, that they’ll be able to see that history playing out in this story.”

It’s surprising that the film ends as it begins, with an image of the road. This time it’s a symbol of freedom: Brown rides his motorcycle under open sky. When filming wrapped up, he still had a year left of his sentence. From prison, he periodically mailed Riccobono pages from the journal the director had asked him to keep, also writing poetry and participating in an addiction-treatment program.

“We didn’t want to end the film with him behind bars, because we felt like his story wasn’t going to end there, and that there was more for him to do,” says Riccobono. “It wasn’t to let the audience off the hook—it just felt like it wouldn’t have been fair to his story.”

Brown is joining the filmmakers in New York and Los Angeles for The Seventh Fire’s theatrical release this month. Riccobono hasn’t been in touch with Fineday for a few months, but last heard that he had moved away from Pine Point, and was now working fast-food and construction jobs: “I wouldn’t say that he’s out of the woods, but he’s been making some choices to change his life.”

Reviewing the documentary’s events remains difficult, Brown told the White House audience last spring. “I’ve watched it seven times, and it gets harder and harder.” He added that he wanted to continue to work on his art—on telling his own stories, and more of them. “Writing gives me a chance to escape from the current situation,” he said. “When I write, I’m not a mascot. I’m not dehumanized. I can actually create individuals who interact with each other, and it gives me a chance to go back in time and do things that I was never allowed to do, but wanted to do.”

The Seventh Fire premiered at the Berlin Film Festival in 2015, and opens in New York on July 22. Other alumni involved with the documentary include executive producers Terrence Malick ’65 and Natalie Portman ’03, editors Michael J. Palmer ’03 and Adelaide Papazoglou ’02, and associate producer Henry Rich ’02. A profile of composer Nicholas Britell ’03 appears in the September-October 2016 print issue.

 

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Yale Law Journal – Foundling Fathers: (Non-)Marriage and Parental Rights in the Age of Equality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the spring of 1970, less than two years after the death of his “common-law wife” of eighteen years, Peter Stanley looked on helplessly as a judge declared his two young children wards of the state, condemning them to a series of foster placements and their father to years of legal turmoil.  Illinois’s definition of “parent” excluded “natural” fathers of illegitimate children, thus denying Stanley even a hearing to determine whether he was fit to parent the children he loved and had helped to raise from birth. These were the stark facts that Peter Stanley’s lawyers presented to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1971. The reality of Stanley’s legal status and of his record as a father was more complicated.59

But if Stanley had been a woman, married or unmarried, or if he had been able to produce proof of a valid marriage to the children’s mother, he would have been their legal parent and would almost certainly not have lost his parental rights. Stanley’s inability to produce a marriage certificate made him a legal stranger to Kimberly, age two-and-a-half, and Peter Jr., age one-and-a-half.60

In some states, Stanley could have presented proof of a common law marriage, but Illinois abolished that institution early in the twentieth century.61

Instead, Stanley’s attorneys argued that Stanley “did build up and develop a father relationship” with his children. “[W]e feel,” said Fred Meinfelder of Legal Aid, that “while he was not legally married to his wife that that should not be a basis for removing those children from him . . . .”62

State officials told the judge that Stanley was “not in a position to provide financial support” for his children but that “if he did have some progress and was to marry and establish an orderly family situation” he might be able to petition for custody later.63

His lawyers emphasized that if Stanley were not a legally recognized parent, he would have no standing to petition later for custody or any other rights. And while he might be able to find a wife and “establish an orderly family situation” in the future, under Illinois law Stanley could do nothing to change his legal parenthood status with regard to Kimberly and Peter, Jr.  As an amicus brief later put it, “there is no way to marry a dead person.”64

Before the Illinois Supreme Court, Stanley’s lawyers argued that the exclusion of fathers of illegitimate children from the category of “parent” violated the Fourteenth Amendment.65

In a cryptic opinion, the Illinois court ruled that unmarried fathers had no rights to their natural children unless such rights were granted to them by a court in an adoption or guardianship proceeding.66

Stanley had not sought guardianship or custody of his children, preferring to leave them in the care of a married couple whom he had asked to look after Kimberly and Peter Jr. a few months earlier. Pursuing an adoption would have been risky, as Stanley would have been required to meet a much higher standard than mere fitness—he would have had to prove himself a “suitable” parent.67

As a practical matter, then, the court’s ruling meant that he could be denied all access to the children—and indeed, he later petitioned for visitation to no avail.68

Source: Yale Law Journal – Foundling Fathers: (Non-)Marriage and Parental Rights in the Age of Equality

 

this research outlines the pervasive intrusion of religion and law in to the most basic human activity: parenting your own child… it’s disgusting… Lara

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Required Reading: How cultural appropriation is hurting indigenous artists

Janet Rogers says cultural appropriation is when one person from one culture, takes culturally distinct items, aesthetics, spiritual practices or artwork from another culture and mimics it. (Blair Russell)

How cultural appropriation is hurting indigenous artists:

Q: How is it harmful to Indigenous art and artists?

A: It really is our number one source of private direct revenue into our communities, so it’s got a huge economic impact. From a cultural side, it’s a written language here to us on the coast. A lot of people don’t understand that when they are appropriating our artwork that our history, our culture and even our laws are codified into this, so that when you take it and you manipulate it and you bastardise it and you put it out there as your own without understanding the meaning, you’re doing significant damage.

Source: Required Reading

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What if “the vocal adoptees” are right? | The adopted ones blog

So, when natural feelings come up, how can you expect others to get it?

Source: What if “the vocal adoptees” are right? | The adopted ones blog

‘My ancestor the Indian Princess’ – Vita Brevis

 

[1] Recognition in a tribe is not always a black or white issue and there are exceptions to this rule, such as instances where one is raised in the culture or on a reservation but does not have other requirements for membership such as a blood-quantum requirement. This statement is not speaking to those circumstances.

Interesting post, but the info about the DNA test is misleading. Due to the fact that not every child inherits every gene from his parents, etc., it is quite possible for a sibling or a first cousin to have Native American (or any other) DNA markers when another one does not. The fact that you do not have a particular type of DNA does not mean that you do not have an ancestor with that heritage; it simply means that in the gene lottery, you did not get those particular genes from great-grandma, or whoever it was who had that ancestry. That is why old fashioned genealogical research with documents and cluster DNA testing of several siblings or other relatives is more helpful for determining your actual heritage.

Source: ‘My ancestor the Indian Princess’ – Vita Brevis

ALTERNATIVE TO THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY

Still relevant TODAY

lara

J. Glenn Evans reads a story J. Glenn Evans reads a story (Photo credit: javacolleen)

By J. Glenn Evans

Below is the address I made at the University of Washington the 30th of January 2013 before a meeting of the Socialist Alternative Party.  It reflects my thoughts on where we are today and what we must do to redeem the dream of a true democracy that our founding fathers set out to create for us.  I strongly feel that more of our citizens must run for public office and replace the corporate toadies that have come to rule us.  Power lies within the political offices to make the necessary changes.  Our neglect to monitor the actions of our elected representatives and demand less secrecy is why we have lost our government.  We must began to reclaim our government starting at the local scene with city councils, school boards, county and state offices.

A group of

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Tweet-o-sphere #DNC2016 #REVOLUTION

facebook1
my vacation from Facebook may be permanent

By Lara Trace (beleaguered journalist)

I totally agree that people should not vote for evil, greater or lesser.

Chris Hedges wrote:

PHILADELPHIA—The parade of useful idiots, the bankrupt liberal class that long ago sold its soul to corporate power, is now led by Sen. Bernie Sanders. His final capitulation, symbolized by his pathetic motion to suspend the roll call, giving Hillary Clinton the Democratic nomination by acclamation, is an abject betrayal of millions of his supporters and his call for a political revolution.

No doubt the Democrats will continue to let Sanders be a member of the Democratic Caucus. No doubt the Democrats will continue to agree not to run a serious candidate against him in Vermont. No doubt Sanders will be given an ample platform and media opportunities to shill for Clinton and the corporate machine. No doubt he will remain a member of the political establishment.

Sanders squandered his most important historical moment. He had a chance, one chance, to take the energy, anger and momentum, walk out the doors of the Wells Fargo Center and into the streets to help build a third-party movement. keep reading

I’m watching as little TV as possible but the one thing I don’t/won’t/can’t miss is Democracy Now. This entire week and last week, the debates and discussions aired by Amy and Juan woke me up BIG…

When the revolution came around again. The day Bernie Sanders’s candidacy ended is a familiar death date for radical movements—if you go by the French Revolution’s republican calendar. (read Atlantic Daily)

 

HMMM, this is not an election but a selection... Lara

(my apologies- the interview with Leonard Peltier will publish next week.)

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‘I Am Not an Incident. I’m a Little Girl’: Adoptees Share Art and Pain | Broadly

While my well meaning, adoptive family gave me as much affection as they could muster, their attempts often felt like taping a bandaid over a bullet hole.

Source: ‘I Am Not an Incident. I’m a Little Girl’: Adoptees Share Art and Pain | Broadly

Loving | Focus Features

Coming in November 2016

Source: Loving Movie | Official Website | Trailers and Release Dates | Focus Features

Billions trafficking and enslaving “disposable people”

By Lara Trace (abolitionist)

“It’s all about the money. Human trafficking is insanely profitable. If you really think about it: You can sell a kilo of Heroin once; You can sell a 13-year-old girl 20 times a night, 365 days a year.”

Read this about a rescue at a truck stop

An estimated $150 billion is made by human traffickers, after the number one crime: drug trafficking…just think about the heroin epidemic happening in your neighborhood and illegal drugs being sold on your street. Trafficking drugs and people are street crimes, highly profitable. And it spreads like a plague:  Alaskan Arctic Development concerns

John Trudell calls this trafficking process “mining humans.” The atrocity we are seeing with drugs and human trafficking is a sign we are living in an unhealthy damaged society.

Watch these:

I posted several articles on this topic when this blog focused on human trafficking and modern day slavery, starting back in 2012.

jan_trafficking_month

Young men and women must be taught at an early age that women and children are not for sale.  These traffickers find new victims every single day and find buyers for them.

In the money game, every human sold becomes a profit machine, so the only way to end this slavery is to stop playing this game and buying sex.  Our children need to know that they could be snatched off the street and trafficked, and even killed.

There are an estimated 20.9 million victims of human slavery, with 1.5 million in North America.

MORE Here

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Since 1999, Dr. Transchel has been researching modern day human trafficking around the world. Her findings, after interviews with dozens of victims, will surprise and shock even those who consider themselves well-informed. Besides for working as a professor of History at CSU Chico, Dr. Transchel provides trainings for various branches of the military as well as the state department, on domestic and international human trafficking and she also serves as an expert witness on human trafficking from Moldova in Federal Asylum hearings.

 

Sign HERE: Tell U.S. law enforcement to crack down on $150 billion human trafficking epidemic… you are not powerless… thank you!

 

One of my favorite poets shared this with me last night: https://jdubqca.com/2016/07/23/its-all-about-the-money/

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Precious Little Justice for Hyun-su

Hyun-su’s death was completely preventable because he should never have been placed with these people.

elle cuardaigh

killer

The one, single decent thing Brian O’Callaghan has done in the past two years was to admit to killing “Madoc”, the child he and his wife bought from Korea.

“Former NSA official sentenced to 12 years in death of adopted son”

Did I say bought? I meant adopted. I get those words mixed up because there is little difference between the two, but also because 3-year-old Hyun-su was treated like a defective puppy by his owners. And international adoptees are very much like puppies to the adoption industry.

If Hyun-su was physically harmed over the course of three months or if it really was a one-time, unplanned assault, O’Callaghan’s actions both before and after cannot be described as anything other than premeditatively abusive.

Deliberately hiding his PTSD  – going so far as playing with his prescribed meds in order to pass drug screening – was just the first offense. That he would even consider…

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I have more questions than answers

By Lara Trace Hentz  (simply frazzled)

You can guess by the headline I am perplexed (again and again and again)… the violence we are seeing is a cancer now… is this a growing distrust of the American government? Is it new or old?  Read Race and Gun Violence 1968 & 2016

We need to recognize that the situation in Ferguson speaks to broader challenges that we still face as a nation. The fact is, in too many parts of this country, a deep distrust exists between law enforcement and communities of color.  Some of this is the result of the legacy of racial discrimination in this country. –Barack Obama LINK

Are there non-Americans who monitor America for its own human rights abuses/genocide/voting issues?

How about the UN:  Elections are a vital part of democratic transitions, decolonization, and the implementation of peace agreements around the globe, and the United Nations plays a major role in providing international assistance to these important processes of change.

This question is also BIG: Do the League of Women Voters have any say in the electronic voting machine debacle?  These machines are not exactly honest. Some believe voting in elections has been hijacked…

How to get recruited as Election Observer – Election observation

From Democracy Now:

Harvey Wasserman of Columbus, Ohio, has been a vocal critic of electronic voting machines.  He co-wrote the book, “What Happened in Ohio: A Documentary Record of Theft and Fraud in the 2004 Election.”  His upcoming book is titled “The Strip & Flip Selection of 2016: Five Jim Crows & Electronic Election Theft.”  We talk to him about his concerns for the upcoming presidential race.  SEE THIS

I wonder… Have we, as a colonizing nation, become so disheartened at what WE are seeing… are we asking “why now” and do we wonder if this government is a democracy or something dangerously corrupted? An Oligarchy – or just an Illusion?

Comment on RT story:   Obama not only failed to close GITMO as he promised but has done absolutely nothing to stop the institutionalised racism and violence of the USA police force.  Mr John Pilger’s book, “FREEDOM NEXT TIME” reveals the human rights violations of the USA government and its aggressive warmongering foreign policy which is the cause of all the worlds ills.

I recommend:

Presidential Campaigns Are Like Wildfires Michael Friedman, a composer who has worked on shows including Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, is traveling the country talking to voters about what’s on their minds this election season, and then turning his interview transcripts into original songs. In California recently, he spoke with a jaded network-news producer about Donald Trump’s hijacking of politics for entertainment. Here are her words, set to music. (The New Yorker Radio Hour)

Harlem Radio Station Tackles Violence by and Against Police Let Your Voice Be Heard! Radio, a program that airs every Sunday on WHCR in Harlem, has a devoted listener base of primarily black and Latino millennials, many of whom are outraged and saddened by the recent high-profile killings of men and women by police officers. The show’s hosts, Stanley Fritz and Selena Hill, discuss what their listeners are feeling, and what kind of action the show’s getting its audience to organize around. (The Takeaway)

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Who did THIS (top photo)?  This post is already big enough. You get the idea…

I do have more questions than answers…   xox L/T

 

The slippery-ness of democracy by Mary Beard

 

A well-documented feature of trauma, one familiar to many, is our inability to articulate what happens to us. We not only lose our words, but something…

Source: It Didn’t Start With You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are — WebInvestigator.KK.org

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I’m reading good sh*t: the dweller, what is gaslighting, #60sScoop

good sh*t : parenting, French parenting, attachment theory, Jon Ronson on Ariel Leve, One Story blog, gaslighting, Joyce Carol Oates, scars, memoirs…

 

By Lara Trace (who is thinking about parents and parenting)

This is my excuse for a post this week.  I’m on the road most of the month… read ’em and leave me a nice comment on what great stuff you are reading or dwelling on… merci beaucoup… xoxox

Why the French parents are the best and we (Americans) suck at it: http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/06/french-parenting-government.html

The French have lots of good going on over there…

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Ariel Leve: ‘I was the parent and my mother was the child’

The journalist grew up on New York’s Upper East Side with her mother, a celebrated poet who partied with Andy Warhol and Saul Bellow. Now she’s lifting the lid on a deeply unhappy childhood (WOW WOW WOW to that )

It drives people nuts. But when you’ve been on the receiving end of gaslighting, a compulsion for accuracy can be a survival mechanism. Before you read my book, had you heard the term ‘gaslighting’?” I had: gaslighting means, “To manipulate someone by psychological means into questioning their own sanity.”

Ronson writes:

Leve says that even while writing the book, she wasn’t sure she’d actually publish it. I’m glad she did, because it is riveting and evokes with clarity the emotional turmoil of being subjected to the constant needs of a narcissistic parent. I’m sure it will help other people in similar circumstances. But then there is her mother, who is still alive….

“I’m not panicking you, am I?” I ask. “When you leave the restaurant, are you going to dwell on this part of the interview?”

“I’m a dweller,” she says.  (She had therapy to rewire her brain. It is called EMDR… wow!)

“Oh dear,” I say. READ NOW

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Attachment Theory and Motherhood? 

The poet Philip Larkin was not the first or the last to notice that parents, “they fuck you up.”

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Gaslighting is something to think about (top photo “Scars”): Violence Hurts

20 Diversion Tactics Highly Manipulative Narcissists, Sociopaths and Psychopaths Use to Silence You HERE

Even more on gaslighting: How can I make my parents’ stop abusing me? How can I just make the abuse stop?

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An investigative journalist gets pigeonholed in memoir, and memoir is not the whole truth.

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On Reconciliation with an Alcoholic Parent

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Family Comes First or does it?

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“How does someone accidentally find their biological mother online?” READ THIS CONFESSION

(I was thinking Stockholm Syndrome when I read about her guilt trip…)

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Yup, it’s that Joyce Carol Oates… who does great tweets!

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Sisters torn apart by 60s Scoop Reunited HERE

My memoir excerpt is here

Stolen Generations now on Amazon
Stolen Generations now on Amazon

 

 

NEW BLOG:::: Want to be an eye witness: email me: larahentz@yahoo.com  (writers\photogs are invited from across the planet blogosphere to post photos… you can be a contributor or send me a link to your post)

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